The Re-Steal Bluff - Poker Strategy Power Moves

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Published on 29 October 2015 by Pokerlistings 2798
Stealing the blinds is one of the first moves you'll learn when you start playing poker tournaments and it's a powerful one, but there's a way you can turn that aggressive move against your opponents when they try to steal the blinds. It's called the re-steal bluff and it refers to three-betting with a weak hand when you suspect your opponent of raising before the flop just to steal the blinds. In the latest episode of Poker Strategy Power Moves, we break down the re-steal step by step to teach you everything you need to know to use this move effectively in your next poker tournament. First, make sure you're targeting aggressive players who are opening a lot of pots when they're in position. This is a big tell that they're raising with weak hands and trying to use their position to win the blinds and antes. It's also important to target players who are good enough to fold bad hands when you re-raise. Another important part of re-stealing successfully is making your re-raise big enough that you're opponent isn't priced into a call. The easiest way to figure out how big your re-raise needs to be is to make sure your raise is bigger than the total of the blinds, antes and your opponent's initial raise. Another great spot to sue the re-steal bluff is when you're shortstacked in a poker tournament. If you have enough chips, usually between 15 and 20 big blinds, consider three-betting all-in as a re-steal when you think your opponent is raising with a crappy hand just to steal the blinds and antes.
Sometimes in poker, the right move at the right time can make a big difference to your bottom line. Today we break down one of the best moves, the re-steal bluff.

If you've played a few real poker tournaments, one of the first things you'll notice is when it folds to players in late position, it's really common for them to raise to try to win the blinds. The deeper you go in the tournament, the bigger the blinds and antes get, so it makes sense to try to go after it when you have position.

But there's a way to turn that aggressive play against your opponents. Enter: the re-steal. Re-stealing is when you think your opponent is raising with a marginal hand in order to steal the blinds, and you three-bet as a bluff.

It's a really powerful move, especially in the mid to late stages of tournaments, but to do it right, there are three really important things you need to remember.

#1 – Target aggressive opponents who are raising a lot when they're in position because they're way more likely to be raising with weak hands. #2 – Re-stealing is a lot easier if you have a solid table image, so if you've been caught bluffing a lot, be more careful with your re-steals. #3 – Make your re-raise big enough that your opponent isn't priced into a call.

Re-stealing is a bluffing move so it's really important that your raise is big enough to make your opponent fold his crappy hands. If you want to get technical, you want to make sure your opponent isn't getting 2 to 1 or better on the call. The easiest way to figure that out is to make sure your raise is bigger than the total of the blinds and your opponent's initial raise.

So if the blinds are 1,000 and 2,000, and your opponent raised to 5,000, you must make your raise greater than 8,000 to price him out of the call.

If your raise is too small, players will call even with weak hands. Re-stealing can be especially powerful when you're shortstacked in a tournament. If you have enough chips to price your opponent out of a call, consider three-betting all-in when you suspect your opponent of raising with a weak hand in order to steal the blinds.