Amit Makhija Cracks Top 50 in WSOP Main Event

Published on Jul 2012 by Pokerlistings

Esteemed poker pro Amit "amak316" Makhija made his deepest run ever in the 2012 WSOP Main Event, finishing 47th for over $156,000. Makhija talks about dealing with the pressure of going deep in the world's biggest poker tournament in this WSOP video interview from Las Vegas.

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Floating the Flop to Bluff the Turn – Poker Strategy Power Moves 02:58
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Floating the Flop to Bluff the Turn – Poker Strategy Power Moves

Spend three minutes right now learning to float the flop in order to set up a sweet bluff on the turn in the latest Poker Strategy Power Moves video. Good fundamentals are important in poker but there are tons of special poker moves you can use to win more money. These days when a player raises before the flop, you can count on them making a continuation bet on the flop almost all the time. Because most starting hands miss the flop about two out of three times, you can catch those players continuation betting with really weak hands. Floating refers to calling their continuation bet on the flop with the intention of winning the pot by bluffing later in the hand. To float the flop successfully, make sure to remember these three things: #1 – Floating the flop works better when you're in position because you can pick up on your opponent's weakness if they check to you on the turn. #2 – This move is designed for heads-up pots so don't bother trying it if you're up against more than one opponent. #2 – You'll win more pots with this move if you use it against weaker players because they're less likely to bet again on the turn and the river. To float the flop successfully it's really important to know your opponent. Look for players who are opening a lot of pots and continuation betting every flop. A lot of players know they should be aggressive but have a hard time going beyond a preflop raise and one continuation bet. Good players, however, are tough and they won't roll over just because you called the flop and bet the turn. If you do float the flop against a really good player and they bet again on the turn, it doesn't always mean they have a good hand. If you still thing they're bluffing, consider raising on the turn. Calling the flop and raising the turn is a really strong line and you can force even good hands to fold. But remember, this is a dangerous play and it should only be used when you have a really strong read on your opponent.

Best Poker Moments: Maria Ho Spots Neck-Pulse Tell at 2007 Main Event 03:46
Maria Ho

Best Poker Moments: Maria Ho Spots Neck-Pulse Tell at 2007 Main Event

In 2007 Maria Ho finished 38th in the WSOP Main Event but what the TV cameras didn't capture was a massive call she made on Day 2, all based on the throbbing of a vein on her opponent's neck. Maria had only been playing live tournaments for about eight months and the 2007 Main Event was one of her first $10,000 buy-in events. Now, eight years later, Maria revisits the epic run that earned her more than $250,000 and tells us about the pivotal moment on Day 2 that made it all possible. Maria picked up pocket queens and got into a big hand with the player directly to her left, an experienced poker professional. Maria's queens were an overpair to the board but she knew enough not to just call off her entire stack. For six or seven minutes Maria tanked, thinking through the hand and scrutinizing her opponent. Looking back on it, Maria said it was only because they were sitting right next to each other that she noticed a vein in her opponent's neck pulsing furiously. Maria deduced that since the player was a seasoned poker pro, he probably wouldn't be getting that stressed out if he was just excited about having a big hand. As Maria waited longer and longer, her opponent got more and more uncomfortable. Maria used that information to make the call for her tournament life and when her opponent turned over ace-king, she saw she had made the right decision. Maria faded the turn and river and scored a crucial double-up that gave her the chips and the confidence she needed to become the last woman standing in one of the biggest WSOP Main Events in history. Check out the full video to hear it straight from Maria Ho herself and keep an eye out on PokerListings.com for more Best Poker Moments videos.

How Gillian Epp Became Her Own Boss, Travels World Thanks to Poker 05:03
Interview

How Gillian Epp Became Her Own Boss, Travels World Thanks to Poker

Gillian Epp has been making a successful living as a poker pro for years but we wanted to find out how she first got into the game and how she realized it could be a career. Epp stopped by the PokerListings Video Studio in Vancouver to tell her story. It turns out it all started when she was watching Gandhi at home in Cranbrook, British Columbia. The movie inspired her to travel to India to learn and teach yoga. After class each day she played poker, and she fell in love with it. During her travels in Asia she continued playing poker and when she came back to Canada she got a job dealing at her local casino. As an employee she wasn't allowed to play poker at her own casino, so her parents stepped up and drove her to the Cash Casino in Calgary for her first real live poker session. On one of the first hands she got all in and tripled up. Later that night she used her poker winnings to buy her parent's dinner. The next weekend Gillian and a couple other dealers made the drive back to Calgary to play again. A couple years later Gillian moved to Vancouver to go to school at Simon Fraser University and she got her first exposure to professional poker players in the big city. Gillian was also teaching yoga but as she started playing more and more poker, and winning, it got to the point she had to quit her day job to play poker full time.

The Stop and Go Survival Play – Poker Strategy Power Moves 02:48
Poker Power Moves

The Stop and Go Survival Play – Poker Strategy Power Moves

The stop and go is a special poker move you can use to survive when you're shortstacked in a poker tournament and you can learn it right now in under three minutes. It starts with you in the small or big blind, and another player raising before the flop. Instead of moving all-in, you can just call the raise with the intention of moving all-in on the flop no matter what cards come. The problem with just moving all-in before the flop is that the original raiser will be getting a really good price to call your shove, putting you at risk of elimination. If you just call, though, your opponent will miss the flop a lot of the time and when you move all-in, he'll be forced to fold a lot of hands he would have called with preflop. To use the Stop and Go successfully you have to remember three things: #1 – This move works best when you've got between five and big blinds so it's only useful in tournaments, not cash games. #2 – This move works best when you have big cards or a pocket pair because your hand will have better equity when you do get called on the flop. #3 – This move works best against short to medium stacks. If the raiser has a huge stack they'll be more comfortable calling with a wider range on the flop. The whole point of this move is to win the pot without putting yourself at risk of elimination. If your opponent is raising with two unpaired cards, he's going to miss the flop about two thirds of the time. By putting him to a decision on the flop, he's likely to fold a lot of hands that he would have been right to call with preflop. The stop and go is a survival play, and you can use it increase your stack without having to gamble on a preflop all-in. Visit PokerListings.com, the all-in poker guide.

Set-Mining 101 - Poker Strategy Power Moves 03:10
Poker Strategy

Set-Mining 101 - Poker Strategy Power Moves

Set-mining is a powerful poker strategy move that you learn in just three minutes. It's great for beginner and intermediate players because it takes a lot of the guesswork out of playing low and medium pocket pairs. Set-mining refers to calling a raise with a pocket pair, with the main intention of trying to flop three of a kind. A set is another name for three of a kind and when you flop one, it's an opportunity to get paid big. The idea is, if your opponent raised with a big hand like pocket aces, it's going to be really tough for them to fold on a board that looks so safe. Set-mining is great for beginner and intermediate players because it makes your decisions on the flop really simple: If you don't flop a set you can shut down, if you do, try to get paid. When you get more experienced you'll realize that just because someone raises, it doesn't mean they always have a premium hand. And when you start calling with pocket pairs in position you'll learn that you don't always need to flop a set to win the pot. Sometimes your opponent will have raised with two big cards and will miss the flop completely. When you're in position with a pocket pair you can make your opponent fold overcards by betting, or get to the river and showdown the best hand.

How to Sign Up and Play Online Poker at William Hill Poker 01:26
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How to Sign Up and Play Online Poker at William Hill Poker

In this short video we show you exactly how to sign up and play online poker at William Hill Poker. We guarantee you the best signup bonus available anywhere, and special promotions and tournaments that are only open to PokerListings players. First, head to PokerListings.com and click on the William Hill Poker review. You can check out the latest promotions, screenshots of the software and lots of other info to make sure William Hill Poker is the right poker room for you. Next, download the software and install it on your computer. If you're playing for the first time, you'll have to register an account by entering your personal information. William Hill Poker accepts major credit cards and plenty of other trusted online payment processors. When you sign up through the link on PokerListings.com and make your first deposit you'll get the best signup bonus available anywhere, and you'll also get special deals and promotions that are only open to PokerListings players. William Hill Poker has cash games, tournaments and sit and gos and offers games in tons of different forms of poker. The software is sharp and fast and the customer service has one of the best reputations in the industry for being reliable and friendly. And because William Hill Poker is part of one of the oldest online sports betting sites in the UK so the poker games are some of the loosest anywhere on the internet. Visit PokerListings.com and start your poker journey on William Hill Poker today.

The Cold Four-Bet Bluff - Poker Strategy Power Moves 02:40
Bluffing

The Cold Four-Bet Bluff - Poker Strategy Power Moves

The cold four-bet is a powerful bluffing move that can win you pots, regardless of what your cards are. In this intermediate poker strategy video we break down exactly how to cold four-bet bluff, and we do it in less than three minutes. At its most basic a cold four-bet refers to putting in a re-re-raise before the flop as your first action in a hand. So for example, if one player raises, another player three-bets and you come in with another raise, that's a cold four-bet. Cold four-betting as a bluff isn't a beginner move and there are a few things you need to look out for to make sure you're not spewing money. First, look for players who are open-raising a lot because chances are, they don't have a premium hand every time. It's more dangerous to cold four-bet bluff against a tight player because they're more likely to have a monster hand that they won't fold. Second, make sure the other players at the table respect your raises. If you've been bluffing a lot, or just picking up a ton of big hands and doing a lot of raising, your opponents will be more suspicious of your four-bet and therefore more likely to call. It's also better to four-bet bluff when you have position on your opponents because they'll be less inclined to call and have to play the rest of the hand out of position. Watch the fourth episode of Poker Power Moves to learn an effective new bluffing technique you can add to your poker game today.

Gillian Epp: The Time I Played a $150k Pot at Bellagio $10/$20 NL 04:22
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Gillian Epp: The Time I Played a $150k Pot at Bellagio $10/$20 NL

What if you had a chance to win the biggest pot of your life, but you had to risk your entire bankroll to do it? Canadian cash-game pro Gillian Epp looks back on the defining moment of her career, a massive $150,000 pot at a $10/$20 No-Limit game at Bellagio in 2009. Epp is the latest player featured in PokerListings.com's ongoing video series Best Poker Moments, along with Brad Booth and Annette Obrestad. Epp tells the story of withdrawing her entire bankroll from the casino cage, in cash, and putting it on the table against a wealthy amateur who had her covered. It wasn't long before she had a shot at doubling up, but actually making the call and putting everything on the line was harder than she expected. Watch the video for the full story and keep an eye out for more Best Poker Moments coming soon.

The Squeeze Play Bluff – Poker Strategy Power Moves 02:33
Bluffing

The Squeeze Play Bluff – Poker Strategy Power Moves

There are situations in poker where the right move at the right time can make all the difference to your bottom line. Today we break down one of the best poker strategy moves: the Squeeze Play. A squeeze play is a bluff that you can use to pick up chips, even when you can't pick up a good hand. When a loose/aggressive player raises, and one more players just call behind him, it sets up a spot where you can re-raise and win the pot regardless of what your cards are. Squeeze plays work best in tournaments when the blinds and antes make the pot big enough to go after, but it is also a very effective cash-game strategy when used correctly. There are a few things you need to keep an eye out for when you're looking for spots to squeeze. The first is a loose and aggressive player opening the pot. Just because an aggressive player raised doesn't mean they have a big hand and a lot of the time they won't have a good enough hand to stand up to your re-raise. The second thing is one or more players just calling. Chances are if they had a premium hand they would raise. By calling they're telling you they have a marginal hand that can't call a big re-raise. The third thing to think about is your position. It's always better to bluff when you have position on your opponents because they'll be less inclined to call before the flop and if they do call, they'll have to play out of position for the rest of the hand. The last thing you need to remember is to make your re-raise big enough to push your opponents out of the hand. Usually about 25 big blinds total will do the job. Bluffs like the squeeze play are intermediate moves so make sure you have a solid understanding of poker fundamentals before you start getting creative with moves like this.

The Light Three-Bet - Poker Strategy Power Moves 02:08
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The Light Three-Bet - Poker Strategy Power Moves

The second entry in our beginner poker strategy series Poker Power Moves is the light three-bet, an effective way to pick up chips in cash games and tournaments even when you can't pick up a hand. Light three-betting is when you think a player is raising before the flop with a weak hand, and you re-raise him with a hand you'd normally fold. To three bet light successfully you have to remember these three things: #1: Look for players who are playing too loose and aggressive and opening lots of pots. It's even more likely that they're weak if they're raising when it's folding to them in late position. #2: Three-betting light from the blinds is a common play but it's even better to do it when you have position on your opponent since you'll keep that position for the rest of the hand if he calls. #3: Don't three-bet light with easily dominated hands like weak aces because you'll get stuck in tricky spots after the flop if they call. Instead, three-bet light with sneakier hands like suited connectors. Three-betting light is so effective because you're exploiting a common mistake, playing too loose and aggressive before the flop. A lot of intermediate players automatically raise when it folds to them in late position, but they don't know what to do when they get re-raised. This move is especially important in tournaments when the blinds and antes are getting big. Players will be going after the dead money and they'll be opening too many pots with weak hands. By three-betting light in the right spots, you can chip up without having to pick up a big hand. Visit PokerListings.com, the all-in poker guide.