No-Limit and Pot-Limit Texas Hold'em Betting Rules

Changing the betting structure of a Texas Hold'em poker game to No-Limit or Pot-Limit from the standard Limit format gives it a very different character, requiring a separate set of rules in many situations.

No-Limit means that the amount of a wager is limited only by the table stakes rule, so any or all of a player's chips may be wagered.

The rules of no-limit play also apply to pot-limit play, except that a bet may not exceed the pot size.

No Limit Texas Hold'em Rules

1. The number of raises in any betting round is unlimited.

2. All bets must be at least equal to the minimum bring-in, unless the player is going all-in.

3. All raises must be equal to or greater than the size of the previous bet or raise on that betting round, except for an all-in wager. A player who has already checked or called may not subsequently raise an all-in bet that is less than the full size of the last bet or raise. (The half-the-size rule for reopening the betting is for limit poker only.)

Example: Player A bets $100 and Player B raises $100 more, making the total bet $200. If Player C goes all in for less than $300 total (not a full $100 raise), and Player A calls, then Player B has no option to raise again, because he wasn't fully raised. (Player A could have raised, because Player B raised.)

4. A wager is not binding until the chips are actually released into the pot, unless the player has made a verbal statement of action.

5. If there is a discrepancy between a player's verbal statement and the amount put into the pot, the bet will be corrected to the verbal statement.

6. If a call is short due to a counting error, the amount must be corrected, even if the bettor has shown down a superior hand.

7. Because the amount of a wager at big-bet poker has such a wide range, a player who has taken action based on a gross misunderstanding of the amount wagered needs some protection. A bettor should not show down a hand until the amount put into the pot for a call seems reasonably correct, or it is obvious that the caller understands the amount wagered. The decision-maker is allowed considerable discretion in ruling on this type of situation. A possible rule-of-thumb is to disallow any claim of not understanding the amount wagered if the caller has put eighty percent or more of that amount into the pot.

Example: On the end, a player puts a $500 chip into the pot and says softly, 'Four hundred.' The opponent puts a $100 chip into the pot and says, 'Call.' The bettor immediately shows the hand. The dealer says, 'He bet four hundred.' The caller says, 'Oh, I thought he bet a hundred.' In this case, the recommended ruling normally is that the bettor had an obligation to not show the hand when the amount put into the pot was obviously short, and the 'call' can be retracted. Note that the character of each player can be a factor. (Unfortunately, situations can arise at big-bet poker that are not so clear-cut as this.)

8. A player who says "raise" is allowed to continue putting chips into the pot with more than one move; the wager is assumed complete when the player's hands come to rest outside the pot area. (This rule is used because no-limit play may require a large number of chips be put into the pot.)

9. A bet of a single chip or bill without comment is considered to be the full amount of the chip or bill allowed. However, a player acting on a previous bet with a larger denomination chip or bill is calling the previous bet unless this player makes a verbal declaration to raise the pot. (This includes acting on the forced bet of the big blind.)

10. If a player tries to bet or raise less than the legal minimum and has more chips, the wager must be increased to the proper size. (This does not apply to a player who has unintentionally put too much in to call.) The wager is brought up to the sufficient amount only, no greater size.

11. All wagers may be required to be in the same denomination of chip (or larger) used for the minimum bring-in, even if smaller chips are used in the blind structure. If this is done, the smaller chips do not play except in quantity, even when going all-in.

12. In non-tournament games, one optional live straddle is allowed. The player who posts the straddle has last action for the first round of betting and is allowed to raise. To straddle, a player must be on the immediate left of the big blind, and must post an amount twice the size of the big blind.

13. In all no-limit and pot-limit games, the house has the right to place a maximum time limit for taking action on your hand. The clock may be put on someone by the dealer as directed by a floorperson, if a player requests it. If the clock is put on you when you are facing a bet, you will have one additional minute to act on your hand. You will have a ten-second warning, after which your hand is dead if you have not acted.

14. The cardroom does not condone "insurance" or any other 'proposition' wagers. The management will decline to make decisions in such matters, and the pot will be awarded to the best hand. Players are asked to refrain from instigating proposition wagers in any form. The players are allowed to agree to deal twice (or three times) when someone is all-in. 'Dealing twice' means the pot is divided in two, with each portion being dealt for separately.

POT-LIMIT RULES

1. If a wager is made that exceeds the pot size, the surplus will be given back to the bettor as soon as possible, and the amount will be reduced to the maximum allowable.

2. The dealer or any player in the game can and should call attention to a wager that appears to exceed the pot size (this also applies to heads-up pots). The oversize wager may be corrected at any point until all players have acted on it.

3. If an oversize wager has stood for a length of time with someone considering what action to take, that person has had to act on a wager that was thought to be a certain size. If the player then decides to call or raise, and attention is called at this late point to whether this is an allowable amount, the floorperson may rule that the oversize amount must stand (especially if the person now trying to reduce the amount is the person that made the wager).

4. The maximum amount a player can raise is the amount in the pot after the call is made. Therefore, if a pot is $100, and someone makes a $50 bet, the next player can call $50 and raise the pot $200, for a total wager of $250.

5. In pot-limit play, it is advisable in many structures to round off the pot size upward to produce a faster pace of play. This is done by treating any odd amount as the next larger size. For example, if the pot size was being kept track of with $25 units, then a pot size of $80 would be treated as a pot size of $100.

6. In pot-limit hold'em and pot-limit Omaha, many structures treat the little blind as if it were the same size of the big blind in computing pot size. In such a structure, a player can open for a maximum of four times the size of the big blind. For example, if the blinds are $5 and $10, a player may open with a raise to $40. (The range of options is to either open with a call of $10, or raise in increments of five dollars to any amount from $20 to $40.) Subsequent players also treat the $5 as if it were $10 in computing the pot size, until the big blind is through acting on the first betting round.

7. In pot-limit, if a chip or a bill larger than the pot size is put into the pot without comment, it is considered to be a bet of the pot size.

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Nate 2013-07-06 23:37:34

Player A raises through first action (they were small blind)' player b calls, player c goes all in, raising above what player A had initially rose. Can player A then continue to raise above what player C went all in with as to encourage or discourage player B to continue playing, or does player A have to call player C, thus satisfying player B (if player B then meets the additional raise of Player C?).

Please help as this came in on a big hand tonight (no limit) and there is a big dispute as player b is stating I could only call player c, and I couldn't raise further, even though player b raised me technically, and player A, as I know should have the option to call or raise towards player b, and then player b has the option to stay in.

Really need clarification in this...

Thank you in advance.

Nate 2013-07-06 23:37:34

Player A raises through first action (they were small blind)' player b calls, player c goes all in, raising above what player A had initially rose. Can player A then continue to raise above what player C went all in with as to encourage or discourage player B to continue playing, or does player A have to call player C, thus satisfying player B (if player B then meets the additional raise of Player C?).

Please help as this came in on a big hand tonight (no limit) and there is a big dispute as player b is stating I could only call player c, and I couldn't raise further, even though player b raised me technically, and player A, as I know should have the option to call or raise towards player b, and then player b has the option to stay in.

Really need clarification in this...

Thank you in advance.

Brian Harris 2013-03-07 18:10:08

If a player bets 600. Tourney There are 500 and 100 dollar chips in play plus 1k chips. The next guy puts two 500 dollar chips in the pot. Without saying anything. Is it a raise or a call ? Charity dealers saying its more than half the raise do it has to be a min raise. I say it is a call

mark 2013-03-04 15:10:02

i have a question abouy nolimit holdem if playerA checks playr B bets $300 then player C raises to $400 can playerA go allin even though he has already acted(checked)

Kakara 2013-02-27 06:29:43

Hello,

I have question about all in rule.

for example: 2 players in hand, and the player second to speak says ON THE FLOP ALL-IN first(in the tournament) my question is, if this is considered as normal play. And what about cash game.

Thanks a lot

Kristina 2012-11-25 18:00:45

In a no limit texas holdem game. If the betting comes to player A and checks, but player C bets, when it comes back to player A can Player A raise the bet or does player A only have the option to call because he/she checks in the first place?

christopher 2012-03-05 07:27:17

4-handed play nolimit. First player to act matches big blind and States all-in contributing additional chips equal to less than half the big blind. Is next better obliged to simply match blind plus ovenewrage or are they required to call with the minimum bet of the original big blind creating the potential of a side pot should either of the remaining players remain in the hand?

Mike Stabs 2011-10-22 23:22:27

In a home tournament last night, player A bets 7,000. Player B goes all-in for 7,500. Player C calls the 7,500. Can player A raise, all-in or does player A have to just call or fold? Player C argued that Player A cannot go all-in. HELP!

Uncle Philly 2011-08-07 17:33:26

In no-limit hold-em if an all-in bet is greater than 1.5 of the original bet, is it considered a raise?

James 2010-12-06 09:14:49

Just to clarify my comment below, when I say that the big blind raised my $30 bet more than the min raise (he went all-in for $51 total, $21 more than my $30 bet), my raise was actually $20, b/c he already had $10 in. You probably figured that out, but just wanted to clarify.

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