Norwegian Amateur Elisabeth Hille Deep in WSOP Main Event

Published on Jul 2012 by Pokerlistings

26-year-old recreational poker player Elisabeth Hille has a big stack deep in the 2012 WSOP Main Event and PokerListings.com speaks to her about having a chance to win $8.5 million in this video interview from Las Vegas.

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Keep Accurate, Honest Records – How Not to Suck at Poker Ep. 9 03:12
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Keep Accurate, Honest Records – How Not to Suck at Poker Ep. 9

Not keeping a record of your wins and losses at the poker table is one of the biggest ways people suck at poker. In the penultimate episode of our beginner strategy video series How Not to Suck at Poker we teach you the easiest ways to get started tracking your poker results. It's as easy as jotting down a few notes on your phone or in a journal after each session but it's something most poker players fail to do well. Watch the video to find out the most critical information you should be recording, plus a few more detailed statistics you can use to figure out where your profits are coming from and where your losses are greatest. Video Transcript: Most recreational poker players try keep a running tally of how much they’re winning and losing but the truth is, people naturally downplay their losses and only remember their wins. There’s lot of people out there who believe they're breaking even or better. If they kept good records they’d be forced to be honest with themselves and work on improving their game. And if you’ re actually a winning player, you need good records to figure out how much you’re winning and where your profits are coming from. If you’re only playing online poker, tracking your results is really easy. Buy a quality software program like PokerTracker or Hold’em Manager and check out the articles PokerListings.com for detailed instructions on how to use it. Live poker results are a lot harder to keep track of and since a lot of players are just taking cash straight out of their bank account to play each session, this is where most rec players get into trouble. The easiest way to get started is to buy a simple journal and write down the most important information about your poker session every time you play.At the very least you should keep track of how much you win and lose each day as well as a running total of your all-time wins or losses. Once you’ve played for a few months you’ll start to get a clear idea of whether you’re winning or losing.

Poker Pro George Lind III Says Hearthstone Will Be Huge 07:08
Pokerstars

Poker Pro George Lind III Says Hearthstone Will Be Huge

PokerStars Team Online's George Lind III has been crushing online poker for more than decade but in the last six months he's been playing more and more of the new virtual card game Hearthstone. Lind told PokerListings.com that Hearthstone has a similar blend of luck and skill to poker which should make it a great competitive tournament game that people will be willing to wager money on. We've already seen the beginnings of players making a living from Hearthstone and with more events like next month's Blizzcon, which will will award $100,000 to its Hearthstone champion, this new game could become a viable way for people to make money. George Lind tells PokerListings about why he thinks Hearthstone has a big future, as well as how online poker companies could learn from some of the things Hearthstone is doing well.

Shut Your Mouth at the Table - How Not to Suck at Poker Ep. 8 02:58
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Shut Your Mouth at the Table - How Not to Suck at Poker Ep. 8

One really common way beginners suck at poker is by inadvertently giving away information about their hands. This beginner poker strategy video will teach you why it's important to keep your mouth shut while you're in a big poker hand to make sure you don't give away important info my mistake. Strong live players are really good at making reads based on how you're acting, and the most dangerous thing you can do is talk too much while you're in a big hand. As your poker game improves you'll learn how to spot tells from your opponents but for now it's more important not to give them away yourself. You need to learn how to act the exact same way whether you have a monster or a stone-cold bluff and the first step is to keep your mouth shut. Good players just want to get you talking so they can gauge your comfort level. If you're relaxed and talkative it's likely you have a strong hand. If you clam up all of a sudden after making a big bet chances are you're bluffing. The best way to protect yourself is by acting the exact same way in every situation. It's really helpful to have a rehearsed routine you can follow to make sure you don't give away any information by mistake. That routine should start by never verbally engaging your opponent, no matter what they ask you. It's perfectly acceptable to stare straight ahead and keep quiet after making a big bet or raise so don't worry about being rude. If you watch poker pros on TV you'll notice a lot of them do the exact same moves every time they bet. Find a position that's comfortable for you and focus on returning to it after every action. Concentrate on breathing evenly and keeping your hands and feet still. In the next episode of How Not to Suck at Poker we'll show you why it's really important to keep detailed records of your wins and losses.

Stop Making Huge Bluffs - How Not to Suck at Poker Ep. 7 03:35
Strategy

Stop Making Huge Bluffs - How Not to Suck at Poker Ep. 7

In the latest episode of our beginner poker strategy video series How Not to Suck at Poker we show you why most of those huge bluffs you're attempting are costing you tons of money. Despite what a lot of people think, being good at poker isn't about pulling off huge bluffs every other hand. The way to win is by making less mistakes than your opponents, and a lot of the time when beginners are making big bluffs, it's a mistake. There are plenty of opportunities for betting and raising without a hand but most of these spots are about taking advantage of your position, or a big draw, opposed to putting lots of chips at risk with a huge stone-cold bluff. The important thing to remember is that it's better to make lots of simple bluffs that are likely to succeed, than to make one huge bluff for your whole stack where you're basically just praying for a fold. Quick bluffs refer to things like continuation bets and three-betting loose, late-position raisers. They're designed to take advantage of your position and what you know about your opponents, but they're not designed to lead to huge pots or all-ins. These are simple plays that stand a high chance of success. When you're betting and raising with a big draw that hasn't hit yet it's called a semi-bluff. Semi-bluffing is really important because it adds a lot of value to your draws by giving you two ways of winning the pot. Either your opponent folds to your semi-bluff and you win the pot uncontested, or you hit your hand and win a big pot at showdown. Stone-cold bluffs, or naked bluffs, are when you have no clear positional advantage and no hand value whatsoever. People seem to think that stone-cold bluffs are what poker's all about but the truth is, you'd be better off ignoring them completely. Until you're at a level where you can put your opponents on an exact hand and understand how to make them fold, you should focus on playing solid poker and not spewing chips by trying to get fancy.

Have a Poker Bankroll - How Not to Suck at Poker Ep. 6 03:16
Strategy

Have a Poker Bankroll - How Not to Suck at Poker Ep. 6

Not sucking at poker is one of the most important things you have to do if you want to have fun playing poker. In the 6th installment of our landmark poker strategy video series How Not to Suck at Poker we explain one very crucial way you need to not suck, by having a poker bankroll and following proper bankroll management. Most people are extremely attached to money. They work most of their life to have enough of it and losing it can be pretty scary. That's why to be an effective poker player you must have a poker bankroll that's separate from the rest of your regular money. Even the best poker players in the world have losing weeks or even months. The best way to deal with that psychologically is to trust in your ability to win in the long run, and to structure your bankroll and the stakes you play so that you can make it through long stretches of bad luck without going broke. When you have a big enough bankroll you won't be stressed out about a couple losing sessions, and you won't be afraid to pull the trigger on a big bluff, or make a big call when the time is right. The most common guidelines say that in a cash-game you should never put more than 5% of your bankroll in play at a time. That means if you're playing $1/$2 No-Limit at your local casino and you buy in for two hundred dollars, your bankroll should be at least two grand. If you're multi-tabling online you should have even more. For tournaments you should have a bankroll of at least 100 buy-ins. So if you're playing the nightly $10 MTT at your favorite online poker room, you should have at least $1,000 in your account. That probably sounds way too high for recreational players but that just goes to show how much variance there is in tournament poker. These numbers are also designed to make sure you never bust your bankroll. If you're an amateur player who has no problem re-depositing if you go broke, it's definitely okay to take bigger risks with your bankroll.

Annette Obrestad's Best Poker Moment: The No-Look Tournament Win 02:06
Annette Obrestad

Annette Obrestad's Best Poker Moment: The No-Look Tournament Win

In 2007 Annette Obrestad won a 180-person online poker tournament without looking at her cards a single time. Obrestad, then just 18 years old, covered the portion of her computer screen that showed her hole cards with a piece of paper and proceeded to crush her way to victory playing aggressive, position-based poker. Obrestad has since won the World Series of Poker Europe Main Event for £1 million but says more people know her from winning a $4 online tournament blind than being a WSOP champion. In the latest episode of PokerListings.com's new series “Best Poker Moments”, Obrestad reflects on what it was like winning that tournament blind and the reaction she got from poker players and fans. In addition to being an amazing feat, her accomplishment also stands as compelling evidence for poker being a predominantly skill-based game. Listen to Annette Obrestad talk about her best poker moment and keep your eye out for new episodes coming to PokerListings.com soon.

Will Tonking Makes 2014 WSOP Main Event November Nine 03:24
November Nine

Will Tonking Makes 2014 WSOP Main Event November Nine

Will Tonking is a professional poker player but he's never had an opportunity like this before. Tonking has made the biggest final table in poker, the WSOP Main Event November Nine, and has a chance at the $10 million first-place prize and the title of world champion of poker when he returns to Las Vegas in a few months. Tonking is from New Jersey and before this event had just $93,000 in live tournament earnings. He's already guaranteed more than $730,000 for making this table and has a chance at much more. Check out this November Nine video interview to get to know Tonking better and keep watching PokerListings.com this November to find out who will become the next world champion of poker.

Felix Stephensen is First WSOP November Niner from Norway 03:27
WSOP 2014

Felix Stephensen is First WSOP November Niner from Norway

Felix Stephensen is a 23-year-old poker pro from Oslo, Norway, who now lives in London playing online Pot-Limit Omaha. Stephensen admits that he has very little experience playing Texas Hold'em or live poker tournaments but that didn't stop him from making it to the final table of the 2014 World Series of Poker Main Event. Stephensen is guaranteed at least $730k for making the 2014 November Nine but has a chance at the $10 million first-place prize and the title of world champion. Stephensen enters the final table second in chips and with nearly three months to study up on his opponents and Hold'em strategy he's got a great shot at becoming the first-ever Norwegian poker world champion. Check out the full video interview with 2014 WSOP November Niner Felix Stephensen and check back in November to see if Stephensen will come out on top.

Martin Jacobson Makes 2014 WSOP Main Event November Nine 02:46
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Martin Jacobson Makes 2014 WSOP Main Event November Nine

Martin Jacobson has a chance to become the first Swedish world champion of poker in history after making the 2014 WSOP Main Event November Nine final table. Before this event Jacobsen had earned almost $5 million playing live poker events. He's got to triple that total in November when he'll be competing for the $10 million first-place prize and the title of world champion. Jacobson had played in seven WSOP Main Events before this and had never made it to the dinner break on Day 2. He told PokerListings this year felt totally different. Jacobson also said he didn't have a single losing level for four days. Get the whole story on 2014 WSOP November Niner Martin Jacobson with this in-depth video interview.

Jorryt van Hoof Makes 2014 WSOP November Nine Final Table 03:55
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Jorryt van Hoof Makes 2014 WSOP November Nine Final Table

For two straight years Dutch poker players have made the final table of the WSOP Main Event and this year it's Jorryt van Hoof looking to become the first-ever world champion of poker from the Netherlands. van Hoof has been a successful Pot-Limit Omaha cash-game player for years and even owns the poker website nederpoker.com. Before this event he only had $350,000 in live tournament earnings. He's already guaranteed over $730K for making this final table but he's got a chance at up to $10 million should he emerge victorious in November. van Hoof explains to PokerListings