Chinese Poker Basics – How to Play, Keep Score in Chinese Poker

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Published on 28 March 2016 by Pokerlistings 9388
Chinese Poker is a great game, even for people who don't play regular poker. All you need to know to play is the basic poker hand rankings. In this video we'll show you the basics of how to play Chinese Poker and how to keep score. You can play Chinese with 2-4 people and it's different from other poker variants like Texas Hold'em because there's no betting, raising or bluffing. Instead, everyone agrees on a point value before the game begins, like a dollar per point. To get started, deal each player 13 cards. Now each player has to organize their cards into three poker hands. Two of the hands have five cards and one has three cards. The three card hand has to be the worst poker hand and it goes in the front. It's called the top hand. The middle hand has five cards and has to better than your top hand. It's called the middle hand. The third hand also has five cards and it has to be better than both other hands. It's called the bottom hand and it goes closest to you when you lay your three hands down. When you're done setting each hand, place it face-down on the table to tell the other players you're done. When everyone's done setting their three hands, everyone turns over their cards and compares hands to see who beats who. Each player has to compare each of their hands to each hand of every other player. Start with the dealer and compare his hands to the player on his left. The top hand is compared to the top hand, the middle hand to the middle hand and the bottom hand to the bottom hand. Each hand is worth one point and if a player wins all three it's called a scoop and there's a three-point bonus. If you win two of the hands and lose one you win a net profit of one point. Then compare the dealer's hand to players 3 and 4. Next, compare player 2's hands to players 3 and 4. Then compare player 3's hands to player 4's and you're all done. Each player has to keep their own score. At the end of the game everyone settles up with everyone else.
Want to learn Chinese Poker? Here we go.

Basic Gameplay

Chinese is a great game for 2, 3 or 4 people and all you need to know to play is the basic poker hand rankings.

There's no betting or raising in Chinese. Instead, before the game starts everyone has to agree on a point value, for example a dollar a point, and then at the end of the hand everyone tallies up how many points they won or lost.

To get started deal each player 13 cards. Now everyone has to organize their cards into three poker hands. Two of the hands have five cards and one has three cards.

Setting Your Hand

The only rules are that the three-card hand has to be the worst hand. It's called the top hand and it goes in the front.

The middle hand has five cards and has to better than the top hand. It's called the middle hand. The last hand also has five cards and it has to be better than both other hands. It's called the bottom hand.

Make sure not to show your cards to anyone else while you're setting your hand.

Showdown

As you set each hand, place them face-down in a pile to tell everyone you're done. When everyone's finished, turn over all the cards and compare hands to see who wins.

Scoring

In Chinese Poker you win points for beating other players in the top, middle or bottom hands.

Every player has to compare each of their hands to each hand of every other player. With two players it's really easy but with three or four, it can get complicated. The quick way to do it is to start with one player and compare each of their three hands to the player on their left.

Each hand is worth one point so if you win the top, middle and bottom you'd win three points from that player.

It's really common for people to play with a three-point bonus when you scoop someone so winning all three hands is usually worth six points. If you won the top and middle hands, but lost the bottom hand, you'd net one point from that player. To keep scoring more simple you only keep track of the net profit or loss.

Now follow the same steps to compare Player 1's hand to Player 3, and then to Player 4. Now compare Player 2's hand to players 3 and 4. Then compare Player 3's hand to Player 4 and you're done.

It's a lot easier for each player to keep track of their own scores against each other player because when the game's over, everyone has to settle up individually with everyone else.