Something Sweet in the State of Denmark: Jensen Is Champion of 2007 CPC

Brian Jensen
Brian Jensen at the final table of the 2007 Caribbean Poker Classic

This year's Caribbean Poker Classic has come to a close and standing in the winner's circle is Denmark's Brian Jensen. Laying claim to the biggest chunk of the four-way chop and going on to win, adding an extra $30,000 to his earnings, Brian sat down with PL.com for a few words after the dust had settled.

I'll start with the question I guess I have to ask. How are you felling after having won this year's Caribbean Poker Classic?

I'm really happy, especially to have won. Once I was very lucky to get second in a big tournament but it feels really good to be the winner. It's great to be the one leaving the table with all the chips.

How important is winning to you compared with the money that goes with it? Because most of the money was already decided in the deal you guys made earlier.

Brian Jensen
Brian Jensen

I always want to win, regardless of the money. I like to win, not just in poker. I guess I'm a pretty competitive person.

Let's talk about the heads-up match a bit. It went on a lot longer than we expected. You started with a big chip lead and got Manole all-in on a draw early in the match. Did it shake your confidence a bit when he hit that straight?

Of course it's tough to lose a hand that way but I didn't feel that bad because I really felt like I was playing better than him. I thought I would be able to get chips without taking too many big risks. I think if I had lost that winning hand, where I hit my flush, it would have been really hard to start all over again for the third time.

Heads-Up
Heads-up.

After that first setback with the open-ended straight draw you were able to control the action very well and you built up a lead again very quickly. Tell us how you were able to do that and give us a bit of an idea about your approach to heads-up play.

Normally I'm more aggressive in heads-up than I was in this match but I really felt that if I saw a lot of flops I would be able to take it more times after the flop than he could. He really wasn't playing very aggressively. Normally if you are playing against an aggressive player you have to be aggressive as well but that wasn't the case here.

So you had a good handle on how he was playing.

Mihai Manole
Mihai Manole

I had a strong feeling that he wasn't making too many moves heads-up and if he showed strength I could fold pretty easily. I felt like I would be able to take two out of three or even three out of four pots without taking any big risks.

How important was position in this match?

It's very important. A lot of the time when I was in the small blind I just called because I would have position after the flop to take down the pot. He also folded a lot to my big blind so he made it a little bit easier on me.

Let's talk about this final table. After you got back on your feet right at the beginning you weren't in too much danger. Take us through how your day went.

I was down when the final table started. Near the end of the day yesterday I had about $300,000 but I came into this table with only $156,000. On one of the first hands I took down a pretty big pot to get back over $200,000. From then on it was pretty smooth. There was that big coin-flip I won with tens against A-J and after that it went well.

When it got down to four-handed you guys made a deal with you taking the biggest piece. Give us your thoughts on making deals and how it went down in this event.

Making the Deal
Let's make a deal!

Well, I was assured to get at least what second place would have got and even though I had a comfortable chip lead you can always get unlucky. You never know what might happen so I could have gone out in fourth and only taken $70,000. So this way I was guaranteed more than second-place money and then we played for the $30,000.

Would you advocate making deals when it gets shorthanded like this?

As a sportsman you should never make deals but I think it's okay when you leave enough money on the table to play for.

Are you a professional player or do you have a regular job?

I'm a stockbroker in Denmark and I've been playing poker for five or six years. The first few years were more just for fun, playing tournaments, but the last two or three years have been more serious. I play more cash games than tournaments. I try to qualify for big tournaments online. I won the smaller package for this one but I bought into the main event myself.

[Up to this point Peter Jepsen had been sitting nearby, listening to the interview and waiting for his friend Brian. Jepsen took the biggest chunk of the three-way chop we saw at this event last year and has since won the European Poker Tour event held in Warsaw last season. PL.com decided to bring him into the conversation and get his thoughts on his friend's win.]

Pete Willy
Jepsen one year ago.

Peter, how do you think Brian played?

Well first of all I'd like to say that when I made the final table here last year he was here rooting for me so naturally I was here rooting for him when he made this final table. But what really bothers me is that I didn't get a percentage of him in this event.

Early in the tournament I really felt like he was going to do it. He's been playing really well and he just had a daughter. He's on vacation here and he's taking his poker and his family a bit more seriously compared to work. But I think he's been playing well lately and I'm very happy for him.

Thanks Peter and congratulations again Brian. Will we see you at the EPT in Prague later this month?

Peter: Yes, you can interview us when one of us wins it all!

Peter Jepsen was just one of a large group who stuck it out at this final table, cheering Jensen on to the win. Although the heads-up match was long, it was a decidedly one-sided affair, with Jensen showing an admirable level of discipline in adapting to his opponent's game. PL.com would like to congratulate him on his win as well as on the new addition to his growing family.

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